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Great corporations exist only because they are created and safeguarded
by our institutions.

(read institutions as our CONSTITUTION)
Therefore....)

it is our right and our duty to see that they
work in harmony with these institutions.

A vote is like a rifle;
its usefulness depends upon the character
of the user. Theodore Roosevelt
Planers Shapers Radials top title history
American Machinist Magazine 1906 115 years ago.....


           The Teddy Roosevelt Years, OCTOBER 1906
  Oct 22 1096 Henry Ford becomes President of Ford Motor Company

  Sep 16 Douglas Mawson, Edgeworth David and Alistair Mackay
claims to have discovered the Magnetic South Pole in Antarctica

  The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 shakes the USA
  
   AMERICAN MACHINIST November-1906.
i st pic text pic 1 pg 1
pg 1 AMERICAN MACHINIST

1$4.00 per Year OCTOBER 4, 1906.

What Do Your Gears Cost ?
36-in. Automatic Gear Cutting Machine.
the dividing wheel rotates to the
Here's one way to find out just how cheaply you can produce them. Write " A fstel " on a postal and send it to us. That will bring you the particulars of the Becker - Brainard 36 - inch Automatic Cutting Machine.
It will show you how it is automatic in all its movements, all the adjustments quickly made, the unusually large driving wheel.

It will show you how the machine runs right along after starting—the cutter feeds through the gear blanks,
then back to the starting point, while exact place for the next tooth, repeating this operation indefinitely, without any attention.
Yes, the word "Afstel " will open to you a much cheaper way to cut gears.
The right Milling Cutter, at the right time and in the right place is certainly a big help.
No matter what your needs are, we can fill them promptly and satisfactorily. The word to say is "Afilla."

Becker-Brainard Milling Machine Company, HYDE PARK, MASS., U. S. A.
Branch Offices: The Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa.; Williamson Bldg., Cleveland, 0. AGENTS—McDowell, Stocker & Co., Chicago, Ill. Chas. G. Smith Co., Pittsburg, Pa. J. L. Osgood, Buffalo, N. Y. A. B. Bowman, St. Louis, Mo. A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto and Montreal. Bevans & Edwards Propty., Ltd., Melbourne, Australia. Ludw. Loewe & Co., Berlin, Germany. Ing. Vaghi Accornero & Co., Milan, Italy.
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Price Ten Cents AMERICAN MACIIINIST A PRACTICAL JOURNAL OF MACHINE CONSTRUCTION. Vol 29.

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE HILL PUBLISHING COMPANY. 505 PEARL STREET, NEW YORK. Index to Advertisers and Classified Index Follow's( Reading Matter. .e4teteA co. 40.

The Patented (No. 4:2804-1842) Feature of A Right Angle Cross Beam ith a downwardly projecting leg, and the Side Head mounted thereon, gave to

The Open 4Side Planer its rigidity, and made it the efficient and valuable tool it is today. The Detrick &Harvey Machine Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF The Open Side Iron Planers, Horizontal Drilling, Boring and Milling Machines, Threading and Tapping Machinery, Special Machinery. BALTIMORE, MD., U. S. A.

Foreign Representatives—Charles Churchill & Co., London, England. Ludwig Loewe & Co., Berlin, Germany. Ing. Vaghi, Accornero & Co., Milan, Italy.
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pg 8 1906

8 AMERICAN MACHINIST October 4, 1906.

THE PHENOMENAL SUCCESS AND RAPID GROWTH "
" AMERICAN QUICK CHANGE GEAR CONE-HEAD LATHES 14" TO 6211 SWING"

" AMERICAN" SHAPERS FOR HEAVY DUTY AND ACCURATE WORK 16" TO 28" STROKE"

" AMERICAN " RADIAL DRILLS 214' TO 7' ARM"

OF THIS COMPANY, DURING THE LAST FEW YEARS, HAS CAUSED WIDE-SPREAD COMMENT IN MACHINERY CIRCLES NO DOUBT THIS TRUTH HAS COME TO YOUR ATTENTION.
THE REASON IS THAT IN OFFERING TO OUR CUSTOMERS ONLY THE HIGHEST TYPE OF MACHINE TOOLS AND SEEING THAT THEY GET THEM

WE HAVE MET ALL THE RE-QUIREMENTS OF THE "UP-TO-DATE," "WIDE-AWAKE" MANUFACTURER. FURNISHED WITH BELT OR MOTOR DRIVE. OUR BOOKS ARE FULL OF REPEAT ORDERS.

U AMERICAN " "PATENTED" GEARED-HEAD LATHES 14 TO 62" SWING

" AMERICAN " PLANERS I, 2 OR 4 SPEEDS 2211 TO 72" BETWEEN HOUSINGS

" AMERICAN " DRILL PRESSES 13" TO 36" SWING

THE AMERICAN TOOL WORKS CO.
CINCINNATI, 0., U. S. A.
((((((((( text

AMERICAN MACHINIST October 4, 1906.

October 4, 1906. AMERICAN MACHINIST
CUTTING-OFF WITH INGREASE SPEED Leather BELT OR MOTOR DRIVE.
pg 3

These machines are provided with an automatic variable feed and speed arrangement, by which the feed of the cutting tool and the speed of the spindle are proportionately increased as the cutting tool advances toward the center of work.

Built in three sizes having automatic feed, stop motion, adjustable gauge (quickly set for different lengths of shafts), oil tank and pump. Cutting blade secured or released very quickly. Work is held in a hollow spindle having a chuck at each end. Quick delivery on machine for y81 to 3Y4." bars.

CATALOGUE WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST.
PRATT & WHITNEY GOMPANY, HARTFORD, ODIN'S., U.S.A.
OFFICES—Trinity Buildinii, 111 Broadway, New York. Boston Oliver Bldg. Chicago : 46 South Canal St. Pittsburg : Frick Bldg. St. Louis : 516 North 3d St. Philadelphia : 21st and Callowhill Sts. Birmingham, Ala., First National Bank Bldg. Agents : The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver,

24-Inch Engine Lathe
With New Patented Instantaneous Chan Device for Feeds and Screw Cuttin With Three-Step Cone and Double Bac ge Gear g. k Gear.

The gear changing device is the simplest of its kind and gives a wide range of feeds and screw cutting without duplication forty changes in all. Reverse feed in the head for both feed and screw cutting; reverse in the apron for feeds; power cross feed (cross feed and length feed may be operated at the same time). Longitudinal and cross feeds cannot be engaged when c utting screws. If you are interested in any size lathe between 18" and 48" we invite a searching investigation of our products.

SCHUMACHER & BOYE
Engine Lathes 18" to 48" Swing CINCINNATI, OHIO, U. S. A.

FOREIGN AGENTS Ph. Bonvillain & E. Ronceray, 17 & 19 Villa Faucheur, Paris, France. Buck & Hickman, 2 and 4 Whit-chapel Road. London, E. C., England. Ludwig Loewe & Co., Huttenstrasse 17-20, Berlin, Germany. Takata & Co., Japan.

1906

4 Cylinder Runabout
This car — Model N —Is the biggest reveletheo ,et made In Autuass4,:1, construction. A car ci this ewe for less than 4',0 seemed an Imre, .ileltry. hut here it IS 4 Cylinder-15 hp. Direct Prise ',Pent 4." mars 74.1uch wheel base 78 Weight 700 pounds


Model K
6 cylinders —40 U. P.. 4 to 50 miles pet hour on high gear. Perfected magneto health:eh mechanical oiler, 114 loch wheel bate, lumtnoutt holy for S passengers. weight NOG pounds. Price $2500.

No further particulars will be given until these can are shown for the Amt time at the Automobile Club of America's Show at the Sixty-ninth Regiment Armory, New York City, I y thirteenth to twentieth.
Deliveries for Models N & K will not be made before March
pm.. will be a "Pont Year." Agent. who hate closed with us can congratulate themultes.

FORD MOTOR CO., Detroit
Members American Motor Car Manufacturers Association, Chicago Bra:eats 147449 141 1$3 Col•mlons Avenue. Poston. 1723 'headway. New York. 717 Main Street. Mullahs Broad and Ilutzonstood Streets. Philadelphia. 1413 Michigan Attente. ChiCagO. flatland and Kama City. tie.tdtem Odle nefrptied of 14.wd Naar Co.. Cicada, Ltd., Iraltertille. Ont.
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AMERICAN MACHINIST page 7

November, 1877.] AMERICAN MACHINIST.

The envelop of fusible metal is repre-sented by the dotted space between the parts A and E. This envelop is cast upon the inner cone E, and is subsequently turned and screwed or chased to fit and screw into the outer cone, A ; or it may be found to be convenient to cast the envelop of fusible metal upon the said inner cone in a mold which would be constructed to impart the required form to the outside of the said envelop, and to form the screw-thread upon the cylindrical part thereof, thus dispensing with the necessity for turning the fusible metal to fit the inside of the outer cone. The envelop may be cast separate from the inner cone, and be subsequently screwed upon the inner cone, in which case the inner cone would be formed with a scrow-thread, Its in the drawing. It ,ry that the outer surface of the envelop shall lit the interior of the cone c with sufficient oxatt-ness to prevent the escape of water when the inner cone is screwed into its place within the outer cone. When so screwed into posi-tion the flange e covers the base of the envelop of fusible metal, and prevents the direct action of the fire upon such metal. In the case of plugs as previously con-structed, the fusible metal sometimes melts partially, so as to permit a slight escape of steam, which checks the complete fusion of the metal, and, the inner cone not being blown out, a sufficient outlet for the steam is not formed. The flange e is intended to

In this case the belt shall be of such an elas-ticity, that after it is put on the pulleys, 40 pounds more tension shall stretch the belt to twice its present length. Now if the 40 pounds of work is put upon the driven pulley and the driver is started, the driven pulley will not move until one-half of the work side of the belt has passed to the driver, and then each inch of the stretched part. of the belt, as it leaves the driven pulley, will contract to one-half an inch, and as the belt on the slack side goes upon the driven pulley, in its con-tracted state, will, as the pulley revolves and is put under the 40 pounds strain, elongate from one-half an inch to the full inch,, and we will have the driver making 100, and the driven 50 revolutions, and the belt not slip. Now every hell has some elasticity, and all have more 11110► is generally supposed. Thinli how 1110011 the belt is stretched to make the ends meet when you lace it anew, and look at a belt running without a load, and then with all the load the belt can carry, and see the difference in the slack side, and you will see the elasticity of the belt very plainly. As all the difference in the slack side is the stretch of the work side of the belt. Now with the two belts and their pulleys ; if one belt has an elasticity of 1-18 of an inch to each foot of its length, and the others 1-32 of an inch to each foot of its length, then there will have to be a continual slip, one way or the other, of 1-32 of an inch for every foot the belt travels. Suppose that one-half of ones belt .4_4_1_1 00_g fila nligo upon the iron surface of the pulley. This dif-ference is entirely due to the elasticity of the surface in contact. In putting on this cover, I warrant it to do double the work before the belt will slip ; and in practice, I have found it will do so in every case. Wrap of the belt has much more to do with fric-tion than is generally known. We will take the same belt and the plain pulley, and ar-range the belt so that it embraces but 90° or one-fourth the circumference of the pulley, the weight hanging in the same place, I re-volve the pulley and the spring balance shows five pounds, that is one pound of friction for four pounds of tension, with 90° of wrap. Now we will lo %or the loop end of the belt until it embraces 135," and revolve the pulley, the spring balance marks six pounds. We now have two pounds of friction or double,. while we have increased the belt surface but 45° of wrap, or one-half ; we now put the loop end so that it embraces 180° or one-half the circumference, adding 45° more wrap, and turn the pulley, and the spring balance shows eight pounds, or four pounds as the friction ; by adding one-third more wrap we have doubled the friction or working capacity of the belt and pulley. There is found in some of the books on belt-ing, that if a belt is run over a large and a small pulley, the belt will slip on the large as much as on the small one. A belt holds on a pulley as the square of the degrees of wrap, and as a straight belt from a large to a 1 5/10 nails through them both, that clinch when the point strikes the face of the pulley, so that the cover when on is as a whole one. One end of the cover is riveted to the pulley and wound on firmly, fastening the edge by copper rivets, and the other end is finished by riveting in the same way. It is put on the pulley without taking it down or disturbing the shafting in any way. The cover is claimed to transmit one hundred per cent more power than a plain pulley, that is, it will do twice as much work before the belt will slip. It is manufactured by John W. Sutton, 95 Liberty street, New York. *********************************7***************************

is not formed. The flange e is intended to prevent any portion of the fusible metal from running out until the whole of it is fused sufficiently to permit the inner cone to be blown out, the indicated defect in the ordinary plugs being thus remedied. The arrangements for screwing the inner cone E, into position may be varied. For example, the said inner cone may be formed with an internal cavity, a part of which cavity is of an octagonal form, as seen in Fig. 2. A key (represented by Fig. 3) is formed to fit into the octagonal part of the said cavity. Fig. 4 illustrates a modification in the arrangements for screwing the inner cone into position. The inner cone is formed with a shank projecting into or toward the fire-box or furnace. The lower end of this shank is squared or otherwise shaped to be turned with a screw, key, or spanner. CLAIM.-1. The outer cone of a fusible plug, provided with screw-threads on the inside, in combination with the inner cone and its fusible-metal envelop, adapted to be screwed into the outer cone, substantially as described. 2. The combination of the threaded outer and inner cones with the envelop of fusible metal, adapted to be screwed into the outer cone and on to the inner one. 3. The combination of the cone E, pro-vided with the rectangular collar e, with the outer cone and the intermediate fusible metal, as and for the purpose set forth. Slipping of Belts.




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page 8

8 AMERICAN MACHINIST. November, 1877. PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY MIL LER & BAILEY, Editors and Proprietors. 88 Warren Street, New York. H. B. MILLER. JACKSON BAILEY. Edition, 5,000 Copies.

SUBSCRIPTION. $1.50 per year, in advance, United States Postage prepaid. To Foreign Countries, $1.50, postage added. ADVERTISING. Outside page, 35c. per line, each insertion. Inside pages, 20c. per line (12 lines one inch). BRITISH A (.'KNCY. IIAmmoNn At (10., 5 °rovers h ull Court, Poultry, London, will receive and forward subscriptions and advertisements on our regular terms.

EDITORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT. Positively we will neither publish anything in our reading columns for pay or inconsideration of advertis-ing patronage. Those who wish to recommend their wares to our readers can do so as fully as they cho os in our advertising columns, but our editorial opinions are not for sale. We give no premiums to secure either subscribers or advertisers. firlr- We invite correspondence from practical ma ehinists, engineers, inventors, draughtsmen and all competent party after a satisfactory exa_ mination. In our department of manu-facturing information, all " news " we do not know to be reliable, will be ex-cluded, as well as all matter that has become stale by going the rounds of the press. We also propose to lay before our readers regular information concerning exports of machinery and mechanics' supplies, digests of the principal new patents relating to our specialty, correct market reviews and price lists, live editorials and varied technical correspondence. To our many friends and patrons who have so fully and so gratifyingly sustained and encouraged us in this undertaking, we return our sincere thanks with the assurance that their confidence is not misplaced. Hav-ing no old or damaged journalistic material to dispose of, but with an entirely new sheet, original in its conception and present-ing a high style of typographical art, we stop upon the stage, make our bow and wish it long and pleasant neguttin1111100 with a largo audience of readers.

Good vs. Medium Machinery.
The favor with which American machinery and tools has been received in foreign coun-tries wherever introduced should be a source of pride to every intelligent mechanic in our country. Why have they been so well received ? Clearly, because American machines and small tools are better made, more finely finished, and better adapted to the purposes for which riaQicmorl than flâ–ºncto of +110 onma Keep Up to the Times. The most rapid progress has been made within two or three years in perfecting small tools and supplies for. the machine shop. In-ventions of accurate and automatic machinery, for making such articles, have not only cheap-ened their cost, but have raised the grade of requirements, until the persistent use of some tools that were accepted three years ago as the best that could be procured, places a shop at a great disadvantage by the side of wide awake establisments, that are up to the times. The extra cost of buying the best and most improved tools and supplies, to replace those lacking in adaptation, efficiency, or ac-curate working qualities, is more than com-pensated for, by securing better facilities for business. Perhaps some will say, " 0 ! we can't afford to buy new tools when we can't get work to keep the old ones employed." Our answer is : " There is a certain amount of work to be done whether business is slack or lively, and those shops that have well known facilities for doing the best and cheapest work, will get the orders. If you are behind your neighbors in this respect, catch up if you can, if you can't, come as near to it as possi-blet even should it involve an extra outlay or working tools." Taps, dies, screw-plates, machine screws, calipers, reamers, drill-chucks, and lathe attachments, have been wonderfully improved within the time above mentioned, so have many other small articles for the machine shop, not now present to mind, A few months atzo we called on a venerable machin- Tuition in Mechanics.

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1877 AMERICAN MACHINIST page 9

November, 1877 AMERICAN MACHINIST. Page 9
CONNECTICUT. The Victor Sewing Machine Co.,
Middle-town, have sold within a few months over eight hundred of their " Victor Chucks." John Adt, New Haven, manufactures a ma-chine of his own invention that will make 3000 to 4000 feet of pump -chain per day from the rod, It is automatic' and two or three of them can be run by one man. The Hartford Foundry and Machine Co. have just completed a 50 horse power engine (20 inch by 48 inch) for the Carson & Brown Co., Dalton, Mass. This is to furnish power for one of the oldest paper mills in the lltlited States, having been established in 1801. Reynolds St, Co., New Haven, is one of the oldest houses in the manufacture of machine screws, having been established in 1860 They make cap, set and machine screws and machine bolts in large variety, from 1200 to an ounce to bolts 4 inches in diameter. They also make the Eames Patent Molding Machine for foundry use. The Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford, are running their tap-making department ten hours a day. They have unique automatic machinery for threading taps, the invention -of Mr. J J. Grant, who has charge of this department. He has given the subject close study for several years and is well satisfied—in fact enthusiastic—with the results obtained.

On a recent visit to Essex we were shown through the Emery wheel factory of Goddard,
stroke) variable cut off engine, for Sargent & Co., New Haven; also a 40 horse-power en-gine for parties in Connecticut. The business of the Worcester Machine Screw Co. was started in 1867. They have lately built a new shop and enlarged their capacity. They make set, cap and machine screws in great variety with improved ma-chinery. H. F. Fearing & Co., Boston, made the largest chain ever forged in thiS country for the Washington Navy Yard. The links were of at inch iron. They test all their chains on a machine with weights and levers which is more reliable than a hydraulic test. The Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Mass., are running with nearly their full force of 700 men. Considerable new machinery has been added to their extensive shops, and lately the working force has been steadily in-oreased. 'rimy build .cohost and woolen ma-chinery in great variety. The Fitchburg Machine Works have nearly completed a large order for machinery to fit up the Scott Foundry, of Reading, Pa., which they hate been at work on for the past three months or more. They have recently built a number of machinist's tools for the Brunswick & Albany Railroad (Georgia). Stone & Hazelton, Boston, are manufactur-ing a new style of engine lathe. It has a hollow spindle, with hardened bearings and a draw-spindle to close the chucks which are made of hardened steel. The chucks are made to hold stub's wire or wrought brass from 1L16 to 1-4 inch. It has cast iron bear-ings with steel spindles. All the parts are heavy in proportion to its size and the lathe is intended to stand a great deal of hard usage.

The Newark Steel Works,
Benjamin Atha & Co., are building a new rolling mill 106 by 196 feet, which is to contain three trains of rolls, one 16 inch, one 8 inch and one 9 inch respectively. The mill will be completed about January 1. They are now making about 200 tons of steel per month, but the completion of the new mill will increase the capacity to 300 tons a month. Edward N. Wrigley has just completed a four story brick machine shop, 17 and 19 Rail-road avenue, Newark. It is 1501 feet front and 80 feet deep, with an L, 80 by 34 feet. The shop is well lighted and ventilated, and will be let out with power to suit tenants. Mr. W. began business 15 years ago as a dealer in second-hand machinery with $450 capital, his stock in trade con iting of an old iron planer, a wheelbarrow, and a few small tools. The Passaic Machine Works, Watts, Camp-bell St, Co., Newark, have a shop full of work. They are building a 250 horse power high pressure engine for John H. Stearns & Co., New York, and another of 400 horse power for the Newark Steel Works. The balance wheel for the former is 22 feet-diameter and weighs 26' tons, that for the latter weighs 22 tons and is to run 70 turns a minute. The bed piece for the larger engine is cast in one piece and weighs 16 tons, being the largest casting ever made in the State of New Jersey.

NEW YORK.
< Somers Bros., Front and Pearl streets, Brooklyn, have about sixty-five hands at work making fine sheet metal goods, presses for drawing out sheet metals, fine machinery and special tools. John Robertson & Co., Brooklyn, have about thirty men at work full time ci.rir1 find

RHODE ISLAND-
The Fales & Jenks Machine Co. Pawtucket, have 200 men at work,
and find business growing better. They have lately fitted up a large cotton duck factory in Baltimore with speeders and spinning frames. They have furnished J. & P. Coates' thread works with 115,000 spindles ; Conant Thread Co. 50,000 spindles and Clark Thread Co. 12,000 twister spindles. Exports. Porter, Bell & Co., ******************************************************************* s but the re-turn to more prosperous times.



October 4, 1906. page 10 < /span> October 4, 1906.
AMERICAN MACHINIST page 19

October 4, 1906.
AMERICAN MACHINIST
NEW CONE-DRIVEN LATHE TO FIT TODAY'S NEEDS
Our new lathe is so new that we have not yet got our advertising cuts ready. But we are shipping the lathes every day and they are being extremely well received. They are not an experiment. Simply the good old cone-driven lathe developed to fit today's conditions. Good design, good power, strong feeds, handy features. We take honest pleasure in praising these new lathes. So do our customers.

"Second Belt" Drive Planers do the nicest kind of work, run-ning easily, consuming less power and giving a larger output than any other. The Second Belt drive avoids jar, rattle and shock. It softens the action without sacrificing any of its power or efficiency.

WHITCOMB-BLAISDELL MACHINE TOOL COMPANY
INCORPORATED 1905
134 Gold Street, WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, U. S. A.
5



AMERICAN MACHINIST October 4, 1906.

COES
Genuine
Steel Handle Hammer Handle Knife Handle
Five Styles and 49 sizes, ranging from 4" to 48" —to meet every wrench need.

October 4, 1906. AMERICAN MACHINIST
page 2I
The man who buys a "just-as-good" substitute wrench instead of a "Coes" may save about 5% on the first cost. But he loses AT LEAST 30% in strength, durability, F. ervic(ableness and REAL WRENCH value. That's a proven fact.

Why "Coes" Are Best
For n( arly 70 years we have made a ',specially of Wrenches. We have spared no expense in our efforts to improve and perfect them. The steel is thoroughly hardened by our "Pyro.-Calcic" process. The castings do not break the threads do not strip. There are no troublesome attach-ments—nothing to get out of order. The handles are either of steel or hard-seasoned wood that neither cracks nor loosens. "Coes" are warranted free from mechanical defects. Our 4-ft. Key Model wrench is the largest. most powerful and the most durable wrench in the world,
Do you want the !book that tells -about the "Genuine."
Agents: John H. Graham & Co. 113 Chambers Street 3. C. McCarty & Co. 10 Warren Street NEW YORK CITY
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pg 23 AMERICAN MACHINIST $4.00 per Year OCTOBER 4, 1906.

What Do Your Gears Cost ?
36-in. Automatic Gear Cutting Machine.
the dividing wheel rotates to the

Here's one way to find out just how cheaply you can produce them. Write " A fstel " on a postal and send it to us. That will bring you the particulars of the Becker - Brainard 36 - inch Automatic Cutting Machine. It will show you how it is automatic in all its movements, all the adjustments quickly made, the unusually large driving wheel.
It will show you how the machine runs right along after starting%u2014the cutter feeds through the gear blanks,
then back to the starting point, while exact place for the next tooth, repeating this operation indefinitely, without any attention.
Yes, the word "Afstel " will open to you a much cheaper way to cut gears. The right Milling Cutter, at the right time and in the right place is certainly a big help. No matter what your needs are, we can fill them promptly and satisfactorily. The word to say is "Afilla."

Becker-Brainard Milling Machine Company, HYDE PARK, MASS., U. S. A.
Branch Offices: The Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa.; Williamson Bldg., Cleveland, 0. AGENTS%u2014McDowell, Stocker & Co., Chicago, Ill. Chas. G. Smith Co., Pittsburg, Pa. J. L. Osgood, Buffalo, N. Y. A. B. Bowman, St. Louis, Mo. A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto and Montreal. Bevans & Edwards Propty., Ltd., Melbourne, Australia. Ludw. Loewe & Co., Berlin, Germany. Ing. Vaghi Accornero & Co., Milan, Italy.
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October 4, 1906 AMERICAN MACHINIST PAGE 37

Speeds Changed Instantly With Bullard Belt-Shifter Without Stopping Feed. Simply operate the handles of this mechanical belt-shifter, which is on operating side of mill, and you get any speed you want, the moment you want it. Not necessary to stop cut,
find a stick to hold against belt and then go to back of machine to shift belt. All this time is saved on a Bullard Mill. The belt-shifter arms are automatically locked at each step of cone. Belts cannot twist or jump off cone. The belt-shifter does not touch belt when not in use. It is a positive, simple device with nothing to get out of order.
This belt shifter has reduced time fifty per cent. on some work, due to operators in-creasing speed where possible instead of machining whole piece at speed set at the start, as many do rather than bother to shift belt by hand, Bullard Mills have every feature that has proved to be of value in increasing output and reducing cost of production. Some other features are : mechanism for raising and lowering cross-rail by power ; brake, which stops table at any desired point ; safety device to prevent breakage by careless handling of heads ; independent and positive feeds for each head ; bronze-bushed and self-oiling high-speed journals ; construction which permits of motor application any time without reconstruction, etc. There's a Bullard Mill for every boring and turning requirement. If you have any face-plate work we'd like to tell you which size is best adapted to it. Sketches of your work is all we need to give this information. Why not get Catalog No, 30 and learn more about the Bullard ? the Bllard MachineTool Co.

5 30 Broad Street, BRIDGEPORT , CONN., 'tJ. S. A.
AGENTS-Marshall & Huschart Machin-ery Co., Chicago, Ill. The Motch & Merry-weather Machinery Co., Cleveland, 0. Chas. G. Smith Co., Pittsburg, Pa. The C. H. Wood Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Harron, Rickard & McCone, San Francisco, Cal. The Crane Co., Birmingham, Ala. Williams & Wilson, Montreal, P. Q. Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd., London, E. C., England. Fenwick Freres & Co., Paris, France. Heinrich Dreyer, Berlin, Germany.
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1906 AMERICAN MACHINIST page 35

36 AMERICAN MACHINIST October 4, 1906.

NILES-BEMENT-POND CO., SLOTTING MACHINES
CRANK SLOTTERS GEARED SLOTTERS 6" to 31" STROKE 24" to 68" STROKE
6" Slotter. Maximum Stroke 6X". Front of tool to column II". Height, table to frame, IoW. We are in position to quote early delivery on 6-inch machines.

NILES-BEMENT-POND CO.,
TRINITY BUILDING, 111 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, U.S.A.
OFFICES: Boston : Oliver Bldg. Chicago : Western Union Bldg, Pittsburg : Frick Bldg. St. Louis : 116 North 3d St. Philadelphia : 21st and Callowhill Sts. Birmingham, Ala., First National Bank Bldg. . Agents : The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver.. LELAND FAULCONER & NORTON CO, Detroit, Mich.


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AMERICAN MACHINIST page 31

October 4, 1906.

A Point From The Qo- • Book. AMERICAN MACHINIST 31

If you'll turn- to page 24, you'll read this: "PROPORTIONED FOR The proportions of gearing HIGH SPEED DUTY and all the running parts of the head have been made with special regard for the requirements of high speed steel." If you haven't a copy, we've one to send you. iMnagefatcjttgeel radte sold exclusivelyetxhcelusively

FITCHBURG MACHINE WORKS, FITCHBURG,
MASS U. S. A. FOREIGN AGENTS: P. Sr W. Maclellan, Ltd., Glasgow. Henry Kelley ct Co., Manchester. Alfred H. Schutte, Brussels, Liege, Paris, Bilbao, Barcelona. M. Koyemann Dusseldorf, Germany; Holland, Switzerland. Schuchardt do Schutte, Vienna. Adler (IL Eisenschitz, Milan.

THE SMITH COUNTERSHAFT CO., BOSTON "......Put Money In Thy Purse"
The Next Time You Buy Machine Tools Be sure that your order calls for The One-Belt Reversing Countershaft It will enable you to do those three things if you will use it instead of the old double friction countershaft. It requires but ONE pulley on the main shaft, and but ONE belt, and this lessened weight and friction reduces by about 25 per cent. the necessary power. The Smith One-Belt Reversing Countershaft is noiseless and gives a powerful, positive drive in both directions. It is quicker in action than a double-belted countershaft because it has no idle belt—no slack or stretch to be taken up on the reverse. We ship on approval. Get the catalog—it shows how to save in shop equipment.
THE SMITH COUNTERSHAFT CO., BOSTON LELAND FAULCONER & NORTON CO, Detroit, Mich.


bliss
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correct

October 4, 1906. AMERICAN MACHINIST page 25

Don't Take Several Cuts When One Will Do—You Can Get The Right Diameter With One Cut By Using This Adjustable Hol-low Milling Tool.

It can be adjusted to any size instantly. It will mill work of any length. It works right up to the shoulder. It cuts to size with but one cut and will handle duplicate work on automatic screw machines or and turret lathes with a speed and reliabil-ity unequaled by any other tool. If you want a time-saver, a mistake-preventer and profit-incrt aser, write us about this tool. The Geometric Tool Co., Westville Station, NEW HAVEN, CONN., U. S. A. FOREIGN AGENTS—Chas. Churchill & Co., London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow and Newcastle-on-Tyne. Alfred H. Schutte, Cologne, Brussels, Liege, Paris, Milan and Bilbao. Schuchardt & Schutte, Vienna, St. Petersburg, Stockholm and Berlin.

" BLISS "
"Stiles" Power Punching Presses are pal ticular-ly designed to cover nearly every kind of blank cutting, punching, perforating, forming and bend-ing—this includes many of the operations needed in the manufacture of hardware, locks, cutlery, typewriters, sewing machines and many other ar-ticles made of sheet metal. If you manufacture articles requiring heavy un ch ing , you need this press.

"Stiles" Power Punching Press No. 5.
There is hardly another style of power press that has met with such vi ides' read favor. The best manufacturing concerns on two continents use them. Wouldn't you like prices and other details ? PRESSES FOR EVERY PURPOSE.
E. W. BLISS CO.
1 ADAMS STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. Agents for Chicago and vicinity—Stiles-Morse Co., 138 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Ill. EUROPEAN OFFICE—Clichy pres Paris, France.
GREY PLANNER
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page 38 AMERICAN MACHINIST October 4, 1906.

Bevel Gears
are cut by me theoretically correct, and so are adapted to fine machinery of all kinds. I have special facilities for cutting SPUR, WORM, SPIRAL, MITRE and INTERNAL Wheels. Let me quote on your specifications. Special Machines for Cutting Bevel Gearing. Hugo Bilgram, Machinist, 1233 Spring Garden Street. PHILADELPHIA, PA. Agents for Italy : Ing. Vaghi, Accornero & Co„ Milan.


SLOAN & CHACE BENCH LATHES ARE BEST.
Made in Six Sizes, With itttnnx, Time-Saving Attachments. f. ing Machines, Hand and r
IF YOU BELIEVE IN SHOP ECONOMY
Bench Drill Presses, Bench Tapping Machines, Bench Mil 4 4 Automatic Gear Cutters and Pinion Cutters.
DIES AND SPECIAL TOOLS. , TRY OURS
4 -4 SLOAN & CHACE MFG. CO., Ltd., Newark, NJ..

The Acme Machinery Co., CLEVELAND, OHIO. Automatic Bolt Cutters.
Manufacturers of ACME BOLT and RIVET HEADERS Acme Single, Double and Triple. Cutting from 1-8 in. to 6 in. in diameter. Also Separate Heads and Dies. LET US DO THE MAKING. YOU DO THE SELLING.
We can prove to you very quickly that it would pay you to leave the; manufacturing of your Specialties to us. Let us talk it over. T h e Blanchard Machine Co., 64 State St. Cambrid:beMass. "High Duty Boring Machines" THE BINSSE MACHINE CO., NEWARK, N. J.
ol becomes "second-hand" as soon as it is belted up, and generally its selling value shrinks in the most astonishing manner as soon as it is tagged "second-hand." This depreciation should be considered when buying, as you may some time wish to sell part of your equipment. The highest grade of tools, tools properly designed and carefully built, tools with a reputation, depreciate but slowly. If you have ever tried to buy a second-hand Gray Planer you will appreciate that we are most decidedly in this class. The G. A. Gray Company, Cincinnati, Ohio.

THE FLAT TURRET LATHE.
Now built in two sizes : 2x24-12" swing, and 3x36-14" swing. Equipped with tools for either bar or chucking work. JONES & LAMSON MACHINE CO. Main Office and Works: SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT, U.S.A. Lieber' s Code used. See Our Advertisement on Pages 12 and 13 45,000 Kent's Mechanical Engineers' Pocket Book. 16 mo. Morocco $5.00 JOHN WILEY & SONS, 43 & 45 E. 19th ST. NEW YORK CITY.

48" x 48" G.A.G RAY C0. CINCINNATI.OH.
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pg 14

LETS GO AMERICAN MACHINIST-Section Vol. 56, No. 1
LET'S START RIGHT NOW!
.
LET'S START RIGHT NOW
To do those things necessary to bring conditions back to normal. We've faced business stag- nation long
enough now to know what it means; so let's go- let's get started on the right track again. This business de-
depression will last just as long as the people of this country sit back and wait for something to
happen-we've got to make things happen.
We can accomplish nothing by waiting for the other fellow to start something-the chances are he is sitting
back waiting for us. We've simply got to realize that it is up to everyone to do his share, and there never
was a better time than right now to start the ball a'rolling.
Then there is another and probably a much more threatening angle to the situation. The period of
prosperity just passed has witnessed a tremendous over-expansion in practically every industry, not only
in this country, but throughout the entire civilized world. `As a consequence, today, and likely for many
years to come, the facilities for production will be greater than the powers of absorption-which means the
keenest kind of competition and the weeding out of the less stable and less progressive concerns in
each industry. Business houses today are fighting for their very existence, and those who survive will be
the ones that start now to reduce their costs and better their methods, in order to meet the keenest
competition on a fair basis. ~

How should we begin? Where should we start?

If every manufacturer in the metal working industry would start by putting his own house in order, by
replacing his old worn'-out tools with new and better machines, by weeding out bis obsolete equipment,
and installing more modern, more profitable equipment in its place, the first thing you know, we would
have better business, things would begin to move again, and industry once more would "hit the trailof
progress. We, The American Tool Works Company, have already started. Since Jan. 1921, we have weeded
out of our own plant, eighty-three machines of different kinds, and are now replacing them with the latest
and most modern tools. By this we have provided business for the foundries, orders for the steel mills,
and work for a number of men-in other words, we have gone into action in our own plant.
If you will do the same in yours, the other fellow the same in his, and so on, ad infinitum, this country
would soon forget that there was a business depression, a readjustment period or a deflation spasm. It is
up to every one of us to put our shoulder to the wheel, so let's go-a slang expression -yes-but chuck full
of meaning and good advice.

The American Tool Works Co.
Cinncinatti, Ohio, U. S. A.
LATHES PLANERS--SHAPERS RADIALS

This is the 6rst of a series of cost reducing advertisements. The president of every metal Fabricating
plant in this country should read each and every one of these advertisements, and then refer them to
his manager, CEO or superintendent.
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52                     AMERICAN MACHINIST                                                   can be cut to run as smoothly as small gears