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AMERICAN-MACHINIST-1922-page 2 January-5-Vol-56-No 1 starting pg 33
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Antiquemachinery.com AMERICAN-MACHINIST-1922                              January-5-Vol-56-No 1
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                        Antiquemachinery.com
                          Machinery Magazine
                     January 12 1922 starting pg 34
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>pg 34 AMERICAN MACHINIST
Vol. 56, No. I
1921--1922

WE HAVE come through a hard year together, not entirely unmarked, but still full of fight. If any far-seeing prophet toward the end of 1920 had predicted truthfully what was~ to happen in the twelve months to follow, his popularity would have suffered severely. That the machinery industry "has withstood so well such a period of depression speaks well for its inherent sound ness. There is also this to be said--all the frills and useless appurtenances of -boom times are gone and our shops are ready to produce on a basis of rigid economy. Unfortunately, such a sweeping statement cannot be applied to all of our merchandising and distribution methods. During last year we brought out the big spread between the selling price ,and the cost of,materials and direct labor in. the .case of one of our most efficiently built automobiles. Later investigations show the figures to have been typical, not only of automobiles, but of other products of the machine shop. fin 1922 we shall give consideration to the sales problems which are en- grossing the attention of executives everywhere. The natural result of the slowing down of production was the release of the designers and engineers to complete the many projected innovations and developments which have been conceived during the war and in the boom following the armistice. Our columns reflected this condition by containing a number of new tool descriptions some 30 per cent greater than that of any previous year--in .round numbers 650. Many others have been held back ~by the manufacturers and will be described in 1922 in the AMERICAN MACHINIST. Features for 1921 were three big series-Metal Cut- ting Tools, Modern Production Methods and Tool. Engi- neering. Next year we shall publish a strong series on machine tool designing by the author of Metal `Cutting Tools. Tool Engineering will probably run through most of the year. Only one or two more installments of Modern Production Methods remain unpublished, but as soon as they have appeared we will commence a number of articles on two of the most interesting phases of modem management.
Sufficient automotive material is on hand for a number of issues and more is constantly being gathered. The railroad and car and locomotive shops are being visited by our field editors and will~ receive their share of atten tion. Other repair shop articles.will come from the serv ice stations and from machine shops of all kinds every- where. Much of the material from the latter source will be published in the form of practical letters. Textile and paper machinery, small parts, press work-all will be covered in our "first thirty-two" pages. Arrangements are being made to add to the value of the news pages. New correspondents, both at home and .abroad.. are being appointed, men who know the machin ery industry and can sense news values. No stone is being left unturned to make the AMERICAN MACHINIST an absolute necessity to the progressive men of the machinery industry whether they sit behind the executive's desk or direct the operations in the shop.

It will take real ability to keep up with the procession in 1922. Business is coming back, but not the kind of business that knocks at the door and begs to be admitted ProsPerity lies just ahead for the fellow who is ready to meet it with a well-equipped shop, a good product, uP-fo-the-minute information and good old-fashioned push.
Resolve To Show Your Faith in the Future No MATTER how difficult the past year may have been,
we believe every red-blooded American looks to the future, not only with hope for better business, but with an abiding faith that it cannot fail to come. Not a faith that expects miracles, not the kind of false optimism that looks for the overthrowing of all economic laws, but faith that this and other countries can and will overcome the causes of business depression and once more enjoy the prosperity that comes with earnest en deavor.
We have had severe and expensive lessons in the eco nomic evils of over expansion. We have learned of the evils of combining speculation with manufacturing in- dustries, frequently because of borrowed money being too easy to secure. But we also learned that united ~ effort toward a common goal could work wonders in production; that real co-operation could be secured. The live, forward looking business men are not' going to forget any of these lessons. They `can and will be applied to secure the victories of peace as well as of war~ Normal prosperity, real prosperity means that when manufacturers are, studying economic laws and are abid ing by them, they secure an adequate return for their efforts. No one who has studied the past--who has faith in himself or in his. fellow mencan doubt that this prosperity is on the way. Just when it will come no one can say. But its coming is sure and it will be hastened by those having the real faith putting their shoulders to the wheel and helping to start the load. Let those who can, show their faith by beginning to buy the things they need, but which they have been putting off. If every man with faith in the future will resolve to buy what be can the tide of prosperity will begin to lap our shores in an incredibly short time. ~ Let your New Year's resolve be to show the faith that is in you by beginning to buy-NOW!

Comparing Prices With 1914
In Making comparisons of machine tool or other prices with pre-war days, it is always well to consider values as well as prices.
We should remember that over seven years have elapsed since the 1914 prices we talk about, and that in many cases the present machine bears very little relation to the old.

The changes in weight, design and efficiency should be carefully considered in making comparisons with 1914 prices, as is constantly being done. Buyers have a perfect right to demand a fair price-but they should consider all conditions carefully so as to know what a fair price really is.
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Lathes Planers Shapers Radials.
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Buying-A M E R I C A N M A C H I N I S T-Section Vol. 56, No. 1
Cut Production Costs-With Modern Equipment.

LET'S START RIGHT NOW
to do those things necessary to bring conditions back to normal. We've faced business stag- nation long enough now to know what it means; so /et's go- let's get started on the right track again. This business de- pression will last just as long as the people of this co\untry sit back and wait for something to happen-we've got to make things happen.
We can accomplish nothing by waiting for the other fellow to start something-the chances are he is sitting back waiting for us. We've simply got to realize that it is up to everyone to do his share, and there never was a better time than right now to start the "ball a'rolling."
Then there is another and probably a much more threaten- ing angle to the situation. The period of prosperity just passed has witnessed a tremendous over-expansion in practically every industry, not only in this country, but throughout the entire civilized world. `As a consequence, today, and likely for many years to come, the facilities for production will be greater than the powers of absorption-which means the keenest kind of competition and the weeding out of the less stable and less progressive concerns in each industry. Business houses today are fighting for their very existence, and those who survive will be the ones that start now to reduce their costs and better their methods, in order to meet the keenest competition on a fair basis. ~
How should we begin? Where should we start?


If every manufacturer in the metal working industry would start by putting his own house in order, by replacing his old worn'-out tools with new and better machines, by weeding out bis obsolete equipment, and installing more modern, more prohtable equipment in its place, the first thing you know, we would have better business, things would begin to move again, and industry once more would "hit the trail" of progress. We, The American Tool Works Company, have already started. Since Jan. 1921, we have weeded out of our own plant, eighty-three machines of different kinds, and are now replacing them with the latest and most modern tools. By this we have provided business for the foundries, orders for the steel mills, and work for a number of men-in other words, we have "gone into action" in our own plant.
If you will do the same in yours, the other fellow the same in his, and so on, ad infinitum, this country would soon forget that there was a business depression, a readjustment period or a deflation spasm. It is up to every one of us to put our shoulder to the wheel, so let's go-a slang expression -yes-but chuck full of meaning and good advice.

The American Tool Works Co.
Cincinatti, Ohio, U. S. A.
LATHES PLANERS--SHAPERS RADIALS

This is the 6rst of a series of cost reducing advertisements. The president of every metal Fabricatz.ng plant in t country should hz.mselF read each and every one oF th advertisements, and then refer them to hz.s manager c superintendent.

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Bu ying A M E R I C A N M A C H I N I S T-Section Vol. 56, No, 1

Twin - Difflcultles Overcome, by a Twin - Service Dificulties in toolroom lathe work-particularly that of getting precision work at the lowest possible cost-and difhc"ulties in production work, have been met and defeated by Porter.-Cable Lathes-the Toolroom Lathe shown to the ri~ht and the Production Lathe shown below. Toolroom and Production Lathes have been designed and built to overcome the discouraging problems in these the two most important classes of lathe work. The Porter- Cable Toolroom Lathe in addition to its extreme ac- curacy has an important advantage over other tooiroom lathes. This is found in the Lead Screw, its bearings, control and operation. It has no gears-is not splined-and is used for threading only. The motion is perfectly smooth. There is no side strain, cramp or distortion. The Porter-Cable Production Lathe turns out work that is under 20 inches in length in such quantities and with such dependable accuracy, it has become a great favorite everywhere. Ask for Bulletins. The Porter-Cable Machine Company Syracuse, New York, U. S. A.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Experimental Work is Exacting Inventors and model makers deplore the fact that they can never get that exact touch to their work that they would give it themselves. They could put their theories in concrete form without a hitch by owning proper equipment, but heretofore the vari- ous machine tools required have proven far too expensive. To such we recommend the RIVETT No. 608 Back ,Geared 'Precision Lathe This lathe with its various attachments offers the resources of a practical machine shop on a small scale. Precision is the keynote of the entl're unit but it possesses not one delicate feature. When fully equipped this lathe will accomplish nearly every job known t o m achine shop pr act ice. C at alog ~08-B is the one to ask for. Rivett Lathe & Grinder Co. Rriohton District of Boston

Rivett Lathe & Grinder Co.
Brighton District of Boston

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Rivett #608 Lathe and Grinder Co. Porter Cable Machine Co Lathes


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Buying-A M E R I C A N M A C H I N I S T-Section Vol. 56, No. 1
Cut Production Costs-With Modern Equipment.

Facing and Turning Main Line Bearings
of the Franklin Automobile Crankshaft
Frorn a Report by Walter M. Sanford, Forernan oF Crankshaft Dept., H. H. Franklin Mtg. Co., Syracuse, N. Y.

To save time, money, and cut out the operation of expensive grinders was the reason that five Wickes Universal Crankshaft Lathes were recently installed in the Crankshaft Department of the H. H. Franklin Manufacturing Company, at Syracuse, New York.
These machines are used for the facing and turning operations on main line bearings of the Franklin Automobile Crankshaft. The photograph shows the turning of six-throw crankshafts, made of carbon steel, from which ~ in. of stock is removed. The average length of cut is about 2 in.

In comparison to the former methods employed on this par- ticular job, the Wickes Crankshaft Equipment saves about 1~ hours work on each shaft in producing the complete prod- uct. At present this houxly production is ten crankshafts, with one operator on the machine.
"The Wickes Crankshaft Equipment has lived up to our ex- pectations in every detail. It gives us a good saving in time, floorspace, and power. We consider it an excellent investment in production machinery."
This last paragraph is the opinion which Mr. Sanford holds of Wickes Crankshaft Equipment.

WICKES ~ BROTHERS
220 Water Street, Saginaw, Mich.
801 Fifth Ave., New York 736 White- Henry Bldg., Seattle, Wash.


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Buying-A M E R I C A N M A C H I N I S T-Section Vol. 56, No. 1
Cut Production Costs-With Modern Equipment.

Allen
of the Franklin Automobile Crankshaft
Frorn a Report by Walter M. Sanford, Forernan oF Crankshaft Dept., H. H. Franklin Mtg. Co., Syracuse, N. Y.

To save time, money, and cut out the operation of expensive grinders was the reason that five Wickes Universal Crankshaft Lathes were recently installed in the Crankshaft Department of the H. H. Franklin Manufacturing Company, at Syracuse, New York.
These machines are used for the facing and turning operations on main line bearings of the Franklin Automobile Crankshaft. The photograph shows the turning of six-throw crankshafts, made of carbon steel, from which ~ in. of stock is removed. The average length of cut is about 2 in.

In comparison to the former methods employed on this par- ticular job, the Wickes Crankshaft Equipment saves about 1~ hours work on each shaft in producing the complete prod- uct. At present this houxly production is ten crankshafts, with one operator on the machine.
"The Wickes Crankshaft Equipment has lived up to our ex- pectations in every detail. It gives us a good saving in time, floorspace, and power. We consider it an excellent investment in production machinery."
This last paragraph is the opinion which Mr. Sanford holds of Wickes Crankshaft Equipment.

WICKES ~ BROTHERS
220 Water Street, Saginaw, Mich.
801 Fifth Ave., New York 736 White- Henry Bldg., Seattle, Wash.


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January 5, 1922` Cut Production Costs-With Modern Equipment
198 Should Be Included
In Your 1922 Resolutions
A good resolution, for instance, to make is to do more of your short planing jobs this year on a Hendey Crank Shaper. This will save time and keep production costs down to the lowest notch.
You know where Hendey stands in the machine tool line and you can consequently have absolute confideuce in the accuracy and reliability of a Hendey Shaper. Get our "Shaper Bulletin."
THE HENDEY MACHINE CO.
Torrington, COnn.f U. S. A.
New York Office: 736 Singer Bldg. Chicago Office: 618 Washington Bldg.
Rochester Office: 521 Commerce Bldg. Boston Office: Oliver Bldg.
The Sherritt & Stoer Co., Philadelph~a; Laughlin-Barney Machinery Co., Pittsburgh; The W. M. Patti~on Supp~y Co., Cleveland and Detroit ; Walraven Company. Atlanta : Woodward-Wight & Co., Ne~ w Orleans; L. G. Henes, 75 Fremont St., San Francisco and 218 East 3rd St., Los Angeles, Cal.; Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd., London; De- moors & Co., Brussels; A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont.; Williams & Wilson, Montreal. Que.; W. R. Grace & Co. of N. Y. for China; Asano, Bassan & Co.. Tokio, JaPan.

Hendey 20-fn Crank Shaper

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January 5, 1922 Cut Production Costs-With Modern Equipment Like the Barber Coleman Automatic Hob-Sharpening Machine.
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Barber Coleman Automatic Hob-Sharpening Machine
An automatic machine for sharpening hobs and formed cutters, and intended to reduce the time of sharpening as well as to make possible the performance 'of such work by an ordinary operator, has been devel- oped by the Barber Colman Co., Rockford, Il1., and is shown in Fig. 1. The machine was designed primarily for sharpening hobs up to 4 in. in diameter and 4 in. in length, but it is applicable also to the sharpening of formed cutters.
The hob being sharpened is indexed at the end of each complete to-and-fro stroke, the mechanism provided to index for different numbers of gashes being adjustable and providing a means of easy change. The mechanism used to give the desired helical angle on the hob permits of ready adjustment. The feed provided is adjustable and actuates once for each revolution of the hob, regard-
FIG. 1. BARBER-COLMAN HOB-SHARPENING MACHINE: less of the number of gashes. The faces of the hob teeth are ground or sharpened truly radial with the hob center, irrespective of whether the gash is straight or helical.
The hob to be sharpened is mounted on a mandrel, carried in the head stock spindle, the outer end of the mandrel being supported by a sliding tail center. Both the spindle and tail center are mounted on a table which travels past the grinding wheel, having a fixed stroke of 7~ in, and being actuated by means of a friction clutch. The operation of this clutch is at the control of the operator at all times, and can be thrown out of engage- ment at the end of any stroke.
The work-arbor spindle is provided with a No. 8 B.&S. taper hole, and runs in hall bearings. The rotate- ing and indexing mechanism is located at the tail end of the spindle, being shown in Fig. 2.
The index plate, which is the notched plate clamped and keyed to the tail end of the work spindle, may be quickly removed and replaced. It is made of hardened steel, the notches being ground. Indexing is positive and automatic. The rotary motion for helical work is imparted by means of an adjustable swiveled guide actuating a rack under the sliding work table so as to turn a gear on the tail end of the work spindle. This guide is carried In a swiveled and graduated plate, which can be set at any desired angle by means of a knurled handwheel and worm. A fine-tooth ratchet can be seen on the tail. end of the work spindle, with a counterpart at the extreme left end of the machine. The overhead bracket connect- ing these two ratchets is really a slide, and is fastened on the right to the arm on the tail end of the work spindle. It keeps the indexing parts on the spindle and the actuating parts at the left end of the machine in proper relation to each other. As the table moves toward the left, the two ratchets engage each other; and the dog, which until now has been engaged in the index plate, is lifted clear of the plate, leaving the latter free to rotate. Immediately after rotation begins, the dog is released and ready to snap into the next notch on the index plate. From that point to the end of the stroke, the left-hand ratchet together with the ,nut in

FIG. 3. SHARPENING A HELICAL-FLUTE HOB
Besley
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